Posts by AILA

2015 Talk Story Grant Winners

The American Indian Library Association and the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association Announce Winners of the 2015 Talk Story Grant
The American Indian Library Association (AILA) and the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA), supported by Toyota Financial Services, are pleased to award a $600 grant to each of the following ten libraries and community organizations to host Talk Story: Sharing stories, sharing culture programming. The winning libraries and community organizations are:
Clarksville-Montgomery County Public Library, Tennessee – The Hui Hawai`i O Tenesi Hawaiian Civic Club is partnering with the Clarksville-Montgomery County Public Library to hold a Talk Story program in May during Asian-Pacific Heritage Month. Club volunteers will present a story time, introduce lei making and lauhala weaving, share Hawaiian treats, demonstrate and teach hula and the Hawaiian version of “Simon Says,” “Kumu Hula Says.” The grant will also add a substantial amount of Hawaiian books to the library’s collection.
Kenton County Public Library, Kentucky – KCPL has held a Filipino Independence Day celebration for the last six years. Funding from Talk Story will allow them to continue this tradition of sharing Filipino culture through bilingual stories, folk dance performances, folk songs, games and crafts. KCPL is partnering with the Filipino-American Association of Northern Kentucky, the Filipino American Association of Southern Ohio (FASO) and United Filipino-Americans Mabuhay Society. Each family in attendance will be given a bilingual book in English and Tagalog.
Native Village of Eyak, Alaska – This unique program will facilitate the inclusion of elders in the community to share parenting and breastfeeding experiences with the local breastfeeding support group that meets at the library. The elders will also demonstrate traditional food preparation and artwork. Three visits are planned for the group and the elders to interact. Grant money will also be used to purchase books for the tribal library.
Oceanside Public Library, California – OPL will hold four programs over the course of seven months, with the first story time program in May for Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month. Families will attend a Japanese-English storytime and exchange letters and photos with children in Fuji-city, Japan — Oceanside’s sister city. Over the summer OPL will provide two performances with local Okinawan dancers and an elder who will share stories of his youth in Okinawa. Attendees will have the opportunity to try Okinawan foods. An additional story time will be held in November. OPL is partnering with the Okinawa Association of America (OAA) to select materials for circulation and story time.
Pacific Islands University, Guam – PIU will hold a Talk Story event in September 2015 with two local elementary schools, both with substantial APA student populations. The program will consist of readings of books about Micronesians, an art project and refreshments. Two additional Talk Story reading events are scheduled to be held at the elementary schools with each school library receiving donations of one-to-two culturally relevant children’s books.  The University will also increase its collections of books on APA populations, specifically Micronesians, for PIU education students and library employees.
Palms-Rancho Park Library, California – Palms-Rancho Park Library, a branch of the Los Angeles Public Library, will be holding a Children’s Chinese Day program in June 2015, hosted by a WorldSpeak teacher. Children will make moon cakes, a Chinese dragon mask and have a parade. Funds will be primarily used to support growth of the Mandarin collection, to purchase bilingual books and audio-visual materials to support native Chinese speakers and Chinese language learners.
Red Lake Nation College, Minnesota – To coincide with the opening of a new academic/community library building, Red Lake Nation College will host two storytelling sessions that will revolve around elders sharing stories with the children based on the oral tradition. The children will then have the opportunity to read stories to the elders using books purchased with Talk Story funds. Recordings will be made to create and preserve the oral history of traditional Ojibwe stories. A group activity will also take place that will engage the children in creating a permanent display for the library in order to establish the library as a community gathering place.
San Juan College, New Mexico – San Juan College operates a childcare facility that provides hands-on learning for both children and SJC students. During the month of November, San Juan College will host a series of workshops beginning with a storytime of Eric Carle’s Brown Bear Brown Bear What do you See? which will be translated into Navajo. In the second workshop, students will work on creating their own story in Navajo and English using regional animals and characters which they will self publish. Finally, the students will perform the story live for the college.
Sonoma County Library, California – Sonoma County Library plans to further develop its partnership with the Graton Rancheria by celebrating and expanding its offerings for the tribal community. There will be a half-day cultural event including storytelling, dancing, crafts and food. Sonoma County Library also plans to expand the circulating materials of the library with the purchase of materials focused on local tribes. There will be a month-long display in support of the event.
USD 497 Native American Student Services for Lawrence Public Schools, Kansas – Three programs are planned for October 2015 where middle and high school students will read stories to the elementary and preschool children. The books used for the program, and purchased with Talk Story funds, will be left with the elementary school to keep in their classrooms and libraries. The middle and high school students will be active participants in the marketing of the Talk Story programs by helping create bookmarks, posters and displays.
Talk Story: Sharing stories, sharing culture is a literacy program that reaches out to Asian Pacific American (APA) and American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) children and their families. The program celebrates and explores their stories through books, oral traditions and art to provide an interactive, enriching experience. Grants provide financial support to libraries and community organizations who want to introduce a Talk Story program into their library.
Talk Story: Sharing stories, sharing culture is a joint project between the American Indian Library Association (www.ailanet.org) and the Asian Pacific American Librarians Association (www.apalaweb.org). It started as part of ALA 2009-2010 President Camila Alire’s Family Literacy Focus Initiative. 2015 is the sixth year that AILA and APALA have partnered on the Talk Story project and allocated grant funding to libraries to implement programs geared towards the APA/AIAN communities. This is the fourth year that Toyota Financial Services has helped to sponsor grants.
Committee Chairs are Liana Juliano (AILA), Lessa Pelayo-Lozada (APALA), and Ariana Hussain (APALA). For more information, please visit the Talk Story web site: www.talkstorytogether.org

Dr. Loriene Roy Receives AILA Distinguished Service Award

Honoring Our Elders: AILA Distinguished Service Award

LRoySpring2015

We are pleased to announce that Dr. Loriene Roy (Anishinabe, White Earth Nation) has been selected to receive the Distinguished Service Award. During her professional career, Loriene has served as AILA President, created the “If I Can Read, I Can Do Anything” program, provided leadership in the International Indigenous Forums, created the IFLA, SIG on Indigenous Matters, and became the first American Indian to service as ALA President. Please join us as she receives the award during the Honoring Our Elders ceremony at ALA San Francisco, on Saturday, June 27, 2015, 3-4pm, Hilton, Franciscan A/B.

Registration Open for International Indigenous Librarians Forum

The 9th International Indigenous Librarians Forum will be held on August 4-7-2015 at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

Who should attend?

Knowledge Keepers, Librarians, Archivists, Curators, Information Managers & those working in Cultural Heritage and Language Preservation.

For more information

http://libguides.lib.umanitoba.ca/NinthInternationalIndigenousLibrariansForum2015

ATALM Priority Registration from May 1 to May 14

On behalf of the Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums and the National Planning Committee for the September 9-15 International Conference of Indigenous Archives, Libraries, and Museums in Washington, DC (#ATALM2015), it gives me great pleasure to inform you that Priority Registration is now open.

Priority registration is from May 1 to May 14 and is available to past attendees, presenters, contributors, and those who have requested Priority status.  This two-week period enables ATALM supporters first access to pre-conference and evening events, as well as conference registration, all of which sell out each year.  Regular early bird registration will open on May 15, at which time additional program details will be released.

Early Bird registration is only $250 for ATALM members and $275 for non-members.  Registration includes two breakfasts and two lunches.  Pre-conference and evening events are not included in the basic registration fee.

We also are launching ATALM’s first-ever membership program.  There are three categories of membership, including individual, institutional, and business.  Members who join in this inaugural year will be recognized as Founding Members and receive recognition as such in future publications, providing membership is renewed each year. In this inaugural year, memberships are valid through December 31, 2016.  We have kept individual memberships at the low rate of $25 to encourage broad participation.

 To register and/or join The Guardians membership group, go to http://www.atalm.org/node/63

Hoping to see you at ATALM 2015!

Susan Feller
President, Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums
Conference Director, ATALM 2015

To stay up with ATALM activities, follow us on Facebook.

AILA Hotel Block for ALA Annual in San Francisco

For those attending ALA Annual in San Francisco, please note that we have a hotel block with APALA at the Hilton San Francisco Union Square.

Please keep this in mind as you register.

Travel Scholarships Available for ALA Midwinter 2015

The American Indian Library Association (AILA) will provide financial assistance to two library professionals currently working in tribal library of any kind to attend the 2015 ALA Midwinter Meeting in Chicago, IL.

Deadline: November 17, 2014

Find more information at http://ailanet.org/awards/travel-grants/

2014 AIYLA Announced

The American Indian Youth Literature Awards are presented every two years. The awards were established as a way to identify and honor the very best writing and illustrations by and about American Indians. Books selected to receive the award will present American Indians in the fullness of their humanity in the present and past contexts.

2014 American Indian Youth Literature Award

A color brochure of the 2014 award recipients is available to print and share.

The American Indian Library Association (AILA), an affiliate of the American Library Association, has selected “Caribou Song, Atihko Oonagamoon” (2012), written by Tomson Highway, illustrated by John Rombough; “How I Became a Ghost: A Choctaw Trail of Tears Story” (2013), written by Tim Tingle; and “Killer of Enemies” (2013), written by Joseph Bruchac, as recipients of the 2014 American Indian Youth Literature Awards. One title was selected as an Honor Book in the Middle School category and one title was named as an Honor Book in the Young Adult category.

Winners

Picture Book

Caribou Song, Atihko Oonagamoon
Caribou Song, Atihko Oonagamoon
by Tomson Highway,
John Rombough (illustrator)
Fifth House, 2012

Middle School

How I Became a Ghost
How I Became a Ghost: A Choctaw Trail of Tears Story
by Tim Tingle
The Roadrunner Press, 2013

Young Adult

Killer of Enemies
Killer of Enemies
by Joseph Bruchac
Tu Books, 2013

Honor Books

Middle School

Danny Blackgoat, Navajo Prisoner
Danny Blackgoat, Navajo Prisoner
by Tim Tingle
7th Generation, 2013

Young Adult

If I Ever Get Out of Here
If I Ever Get Out of Here
by Eric Gansworth
Arthur A. Levin Books, 2013

LaFromboise Named AILA Emerging Leader

The American Indian Library Association (AILA) has selected Aaron LaFromboise, a member of the Blackfeet Nation, for the 2014 ALA Emerging Leaders program. As sponsor, AILA provides a stipend of $1,000 to support her attendance and participation in the Emerging Leaders program at the 2014 ALA Midwinter Meeting and Annual Conference.

Aaron earned her undergraduate degree in Liberal Studies from the University of Oklahoma in 2013. She is a first-year MLIS student at the University of Wisconsin – Madison who works for Blackfeet Community College as a Library Technician at the Medicine Spring Library in Browning, MT.  She is obtaining her LIS degree to help move the Medicine Spring Library forward both as an academic library and also as a community and tribal facility.  Her goals for Medicine Spring Library are to cultivate the small archives and set up a clear mission for the space.  She is also working to help the library become a depository for Blackfeet language and stories through recording and written documentation.

“We are excited to have Aaron as our 2014 Emerging Leader.  She is working full-time while pursuing her MLIS, and we are glad that we can support her in pursuing her goals of learning more about librarianship and networking through participating in the Emerging Leaders program,” said Heather Devine, 2013-2014 AILA President.

The Emerging Leaders program enables librarians and library staff from across the country to participate in project planning workgroups; network with peers; gain an inside look into ALA structure; and have an opportunity to serve the profession in a leadership capacity early in their careers. Emerging Leaders receive up to $1,000 each to participate in the Midwinter Meeting and Annual Conference, and each participant is expected to provide years of service to ALA or one of its units.  For the complete list of the 2014 class of Emerging Leaders, please visit http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2013/11/emerging-leader-participants-class-2014-announced

Founded in 1979, the American Indian Library Association is composed of individual and institution members interested in working to improve library services to American Indians and Alaska Natives in every type of library. AILA is committed to disseminating information about these issues to the broader profession and publishes the American Indian Libraries Newsletter two times per year.  For more information about AILA, visit www.ailanet.org.

Toyota Financial Services Continues Sponsorship of AILA/APALA’s Talk Story Project

December 14, 2012

The American Indian Library Association (AILA) and the Asian/Pacific American
Librarians Association (APALA) Announce Continued Sponsor, Toyota Financial
Services.

The American Indian Library Association (AILA) and the Asian/Pacific American Librarians
Association (APALA) are pleased to announce their continued sponsorship from Toyota
Financial Services. Toyota Financial Services will sponsor the Talk Story: Sharing
stories, sharing culture program by providing funding for the second year for mini-grants
that will be awarded in early 2013.

Talk Story: Sharing stories, sharing culture (www.talkstorytogether.org) is a literacy
program that reaches out to Asian Pacific American (APA) and American Indian/Alaska
Native (AIAN) children and their families. The program celebrates and explores their stories
through books, oral traditions, and art to provide an interactive, enriching experience. 2013
will be the fourth year that AILA and APALA have partnered on the Talk Story project and
allocated grant funding to libraries to implement programs geared towards the APA/AIAN
communities. To date, thirteen Talk Story grants have been awarded.

This will be the second year that Toyota Financial Services has sponsored grant funding for
Talk Story and we are thrilled to have the opportunity to continue to work with them now
and in the future. “Toyota Financial Services has been such a wonderful sponsor to work
with and their continued support will allow us to fund deserving libraries for another year”
said Liana Juliano and Lessa Pelayo-Lozada, chairs of the Talk Story committee for AILA
and APALA.

Grant applications will be available beginning in December and will be due February 15,
2013.

An affiliate of the American Library Association (ALA), the American Indian Library
Association is a membership action group that addresses the library-related needs of
American Indians and Alaska Natives. Members are individuals and institutions interested
in the development of programs to improve Indian library, cultural, and informational
services in school, public, and research libraries on reservations. AILA is also committed to
disseminating information about Indian cultures, languages, values, and information needs
to the library community. Additional information about AILA can be found at
www.ailanet.org.

The Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA) was established in 1980 by
librarians of diverse Asian/Pacific ancestries committed to create an organization that would
address and support the needs of Asian/Pacific American librarians and those who serve
Asian/Pacific American communities. In addition, over the years, APALA has granted
numerous scholarships and awards. Additional information about APALA can be found at
www.apalaweb.org.

Talk Story: Sharing stories, sharing culture is a joint project between the American
Indian Library Association and the Asian Pacific American Librarians Association that
started as part of ALA 2009-2010 President Camila Alire’s Family Literacy Focus
Initiative. The project is sponsored by Toyota Financial Services.

2012 Talk Story Grant Winners Announced

The American Indian Library Association (AILA) and the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA), supported by Toyota Financial Services, are pleased to award the Baranov Museum in Kodiak, Alaska, Carson Regional Library in Carson, California, the Jamestown S’klallam Tribal Library in Sequim, Washington, the Mzenegen Tribal Library in Dorr, Michigan, and White Mesa Library of the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe in Towaoc, Colorado each a $500 grant to host a Talk Story program at their library. Read more here.